Frequently Asked Questions

Updated May 28, 2003

Note: Items that have been added since the last edition of this FAQ have now have a icon next to the new items.

What's Here?

  About ZTERM 2000
What's the market for this product?
What's the difference between field and mode terminals?
What's AlphaLAN/FW?
Why was ZTERM 2000 written?
Does ZTERM 2000 support the AlphaNET protocol?
  Telnet related questions
What's RFC 854 and what does it mean?
Why does my PC try to dial the Internet each time I try to connect with ZTERM?
  File Transfer related questions
Is there a common way to transfer files on both serial and network connections?
What situations can file transfer not be performed?
When I transfer over a modem, why does the process stop after about 19K?
Why does ZTERM's FTP client bomb when connecting to an Alpha Micro?
Why can't I see the AMOS tree when browsing an AMOS host?
What is WININET.DLL and what's it used for?
  Registration questions
What's the dongle for?
How do I protect the installation code?
What happens to the registration code when upgrading from Windows 3.1?
  Windows compatibility questions
Why are there two sets of installation programs?
Why does Windows NT think there is a mouse on a serial connection to a host computer?
  Windows 3.1 issues (for ZTERM for Windows 1.2 users)
Why is Win32s needed on Windows 3.1?
What is different when I run ZTERM on Windows 3.1?
Why do I get a "Can't load WINSOCK.DLL" message each time ZTERM starts?
Why do none of the ZTERM versions since 1.2.105b not work on Win32s?
  Using ZTERM 2000
How can I stop an Automatic Connection before it starts?
Why do I sometimes get an error reporting that the ZTERM 2000 font couldn't be loaded?
Why does ZTERM's FTP client mess up, yet Microsoft's command line FTP program works fine?
Each time I launch ZTERM, I go straight into a profile. How do I setup a shortcut to the Profile Manager?
I used both ZTERM 1.2 and the betas of ZTERM 2000. How can I move all my profiles to ZTERM 2000?
Why does ZTERM's FTP client display error code 12163?
  Font related issues
What are the differences between Bitmap and True-Type fonts in ZTERM?
Why can't I resize the ZTERM window when using a bitmap font?
Why does the toolbar get messed up at 800x600 resolution?
Why do some True-Type fonts not have line-drawing characters?
  Printing questions
Should I use the dot-matrix emulator to print pre-printed forms?
I select various options when ZTERM asks for a printer, but none of these settings work. Why?
  ZTERM and Linux/Wine
I bought a copy of Linux and installed it. How do I get Wine running?
And how about getting ZTERM 2000 running?
I got ZTERM running on Linux, but some features don't work. When will they be fixed?

About ZTERM 2000

What's the market for this product?

ZTERM 2000 is written for use with Alpha Micro AMOS machines. These machines are 680x0 multi-user systems that run a lightweight operating system. When this machine was introduced in 1977, it was the first multi-user micro on the market. Twenty years later, they're still making them with the advantage that most of the code written in 1977 and later years can still run today.

Many developers moved away from AMOS and into the Unix world. Due to the rather rare "field" emulation used in the original code, many of these developers prefer this type of terminal for their applications.

What's the difference between field and mode terminals?

When the terminal was introduced in the early 1970s, it replaced the teletype, a hardcopy output device. Initially, terminals were called "glass teletypes" because they literally replaced the hardcopy from a teletype with a screen display.

As computer technology became more advanced, terminal manufacturers added new display capabilities to their terminals, such as low intensity, reverse, underline and blinking options. Each terminal manufacturer implemented different methods of displaying these attributes, resulting in two standards: field and mode operation.

On a field terminal, attributes (such as start and stop reverse video) occupy a position on the display with the attribute continuing until it's turned off or changed by another attribute.

For example, turning on reverse video at screen position 1,1 will "flood" the screen with reverse video because there is no other attribute to disable reverse.

The exception to the rule for field terminals is low intensity - this attribute operates using the mode paradigm.

Field terminals emulated by ZTERM 2000 are AM62A, AM62C, CY-350 and Wyse-350.

Field terminals are much more complex to emulate than mode terminals and therefore the performance of ZTERM 2000 will decrease slightly when emulating one of these terminals.

On mode terminals, attributes don't take up a screen position and they don't take effect until the attribute is enabled and the host system sends some characters to be displayed in the selected attribute.

Mode terminals emulated by ZTERM 2000 are ANSI and DEC VT-100.

What's AlphaLAN/FW?

AlphaLAN/FW is a another AMOS terminal emulator available for Windows. It's also available under the product name Step/FW. I'd been using AlphaLAN/FW for a number of years and got very frustrated with the way it worked. As of version 6.2 this product specifically was:

Why was ZTERM 2000 written?

In addition to my frustration with AlphaLAN/FW, I also need a good motive to teach myself C programming on Windows and had avoided it because of the hassle involved with dealing with 64K segments which Windows 3.1 programmers had to. I'd written quite a lot of DOS based PC code, including Alpha Micro's ETHERNDV.EXE which was used to connect PCs to host AMOS boxes using the dreadful AlphaNET protocol.

When Windows 95 launched it finally brought the new 32-bit programmers model called Win32 to the masses. Additionally, Microsoft launched Visual C++ 4.0 which made writing the code a lot easier.

Does ZTERM 2000 support the AlphaNET protocol?

No. Alpha Micro's unique AlphaNET protocol is documented as a "best effort" message delivery system. In reality, it's a "no effort" delivery system. If packets get lost, AlphaNET does very little to retransmit them. Additionally, the protocol is not routable which leads to inefficiency on wide-area networks because bridge routing has to be used.

AlphaNET on the PC is only available from Alpha Micro in 16-bit DOS mode, so as a result it's not supported on any of the modern 32-bit Windows operating systems. Admitidly, it should be possible to get AlphaNET to work on Windows 95 and Windows 98 but both are a hassle to get working correctly and still leaves Windows NT out of the picture.

Alpha Micro's AlphaTCP product (which is now part of the operating system) is an excellent TCP/IP implementation and because the TCP/IP support in 32-bit Windows is also excellent, we only support the TCP/IP protocol for network connections in ZTERM 2000.

Telnet Related

What's RFC 854 and what does it mean?

Telnet Settings

When standards are released on the Internet, they are called Requests For Comments and document the behavior of a part of the way in which the Internet works.

RFC 854 documents how the telnet protocol works and specifies that whenever host systems send certain characters, such as carriage returns, that they are encoded in a special way. For example, a carriage return followed by an * is actually sent as <CR> <NUL> *. Obviously, telnet clients then perform the appropriate processing, normally removing the extra null from the host.

Alpha Micro's otherwise excellent AlphaTCP product doesn't handle these encoding sequences. ZTERM 2000 needs to know when connecting to AlphaTCP and this is why there is checkbox on the Port sheet in the Configuration menu.

We tried to figure a way to determine this automatically but we concluded that a manual setting was safer. Simply check this box if you're connecting to an Alpha Micro running AlphaTCP and un-check it (the default) if you're connecting to anything else.

Note that Alpha Micro has recently released AlphaTCP 1.4 and AMOS 2.3A. Supposedly, this combination fixes the RFC 854 compatibility issue - however, this has not ben confirmed by us yet.

Why does my PC try to dial the Internet each time I try to connect with ZTERM?

Windows 9x isn't very smart about knowing when to dial. If you have Auto-Dial turned on, Windows will try to connect to the Internet regardless of whether or not the machine you're trying to connect to is on your LAN or not. This problem really isn't related to ZTERM - if you try using Microsoft's telnet program, you'll end up with the same results.

To work around this problem, you have to turn off Auto-Dial. Right click on the "Internet Explorer" icon on the desktop, select Properties and then look at the Connection tab. You need to set this to "Manually connect".

When you want to connect to the Internet, use the Dial-Up Networking application to manually connect.

File Transfer Related

Is there a common way to transfer files on both serial and network connections?

Upload Transfer Program

Yes. The AMOS ZTXFER program can be used on both network and serial connections. In the case of serial connections, ZTXFER does the work of transferring the file in an error free format via the serial port.

When ZTERM 2000 is connected via a network, the ZTXFER program sends an escape sequence to back to the PC to tell ZTERM 2000 to start it's automatic FTP. Because part of the escape sequence contains the current host directory or "PPN", using the ZTXFER program has the advantage of transferring the file in the account that you're logged into.

ZTXFER.LIT can be found in the folder where ZTERM 2000 was installed. If you're using a network connection, just FTP it over to SYS: on the AMOS box. If you're using a serial connection, go to the File Transfer sheet in the Configuration menu and click on the Upload button. This will then transfer the ZTXFER.LIT program via the serial port to the host AMOS machine using AlphaBASIC. Provided the hash totals that are displayed at the end of the process match, you can start using ZTXFER.LIT straight away.

What situations can file transfer not be performed?

There aren't any. If you're using a Unix host system via a serial or modem connection, use ZMODEM on the host and change the serial transfer mode in the Serial Transfer tab under Configuration to use ZMODEM.

If you are using a serial connection to a host and have TCP/IP running on the host, we recommend reconfiguring the serial port to act as a network port by placing it in SLIP or PPP mode. That way, you can use ZTERM's FTP client which allows wildcarding, better performance and host browsing.

When I transfer over a modem, why does the process stop after about 19K?

Chances are that the modem is set up for software (XON/XOFF) flow control. Connect to the modem using COMx - Direct and send an AT/Q3&W0 to set the modem up for hardware flow control.

Why does ZTERM's FTP client bomb when connecting to an Alpha Micro?

ZTERM 2000 expects the host's FTP server to operate in "Unix" compatible mode - by default the AlphaTCP FTP server outputs directories in AMOS format. To make the AlphaTCP FTP server operate in this mode, edit TCP:CONFIG. and make sure the start ftpd line reads:

start ftpd 50k -n -o

Then reboot the system. The -n option tells AlphaTCP to run in Unix mode and -o allows the FTP server to overwrite files.

Why can't I see the AMOS tree when browsing an AMOS host?

FTP Browse Window

In order for ZTERM 2000 to see the AMOS directory tree, it uses some special commands that the AlphaTCP FTP server implements. However, these special commands are actually AMOS Remote Procedure Calls, so NETSER is required on the AMOS host (even if you're not using AlphaNET).

In your AMOSx.INI file you need to have NETSER running and have a SYSTEM RPC.SYS/N command. Additionally, RPC: must point to the directory where you have the .RPC files (normally DSK0:[7,34]) and the file FTPDEV.RPC must be present.

To quickly verify that a system supports this capability, you can use the AMOS or Windows command-line FTP program and these commands:

lit SITE GETDEV
lit SITE GETPPN DSK0:

Note that AlphaNET's device access control (SET NOACCESS DEVn:) does apply to the list, so if you are blocking AlphaNET network access to particular drives, these won't show up in the list.

I have seen some situations when the SITE GETDEV and SITE GETPPN commands don't work, although everything appears to be setup correctly. If you've got a case where you can't the tree to show up, please contact us via email and we'll try to figure out why this doesn't work and pass our findings onto Alpha Micro.

What is WININET.DLL and what's it used for?

In order to do FTP file transfers, ZTERM 2000 uses a component from Microsoft called WININET.DLL. This was designed as part of Internet Explorer, but other developers can use it in their applications too.

During the installation of ZTERM 2000, the setup program runs a command called 'wintdist.exe' (you'll find in the folder where ZTERM 2000 was installed). This installs WININET.DLL should Internet Explorer 3.0 or later had not already been installed.

Since Microsoft updates Internet Explorer from time to time and these updates include WININET.DLL, you should take care to install the latest version of ZTERM 2000 whenever you upgrade to a new version of Internet Explorer. We may have found and corrected issues with newer versions of WININET.DLL and by following this rule, you can normally save a lot of trouble.

We suggest that you do not install any beta versions of products related to WININET.DLL, such as Internet Explorer or beta releases of Microsoft operating systems on production machines where ZTERM 2000 is used.

Registration Issues

What's the dongle for?

Dongle Picture

If you are installing ZTERM 2000 at your client's site, the installation process can be made much easier by generating the license codes on-site. Provided at least 15 copies of ZTERM 2000 are ordered, you'll be sent a dongle (a device that connects to the PC's parallel port) and you download the code generation program from the web site.

The code generation program is encrypted and requires a dongle in order to operate. Additionally, the dongle contains a count of how many licenses have been purchased and generated. When all the licenses have been used, the dongle needs to be returned to COOL.STF in order to be "recharged" or reprogrammed with more licenses.

Keep in mind that because the installation program is encrypted, feel free to install it on your clients machines or laptops. It will not run unless the dongle is installed.

How do I protect the installation code?

ZTERM 2000 is licensed on a per PC basis. In order to have ZTERM 2000 operate past it's 28-day evaluation period, a registration code needs to be installed.

Installation codes are unique to each PC. After a registration code has been installed, you should perform the following steps to save the code:

  1. Launch the registry editor (REGEDIT) and navigate to the HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\ZTERM 2000 key.
  2. Click on Registry and then Export Registry File.
  3. Save the file onto a floppy.
  4. Keep the floppy inside the machine. We also keep NT Emergency Repair Disks inside the box - some tape holds the floppies in place.

Should the system fail and have the hard drive repaired or have a damaged registration that requires a complete reinstallation of Windows:

  1. Install Windows again and then load ZTERM 2000.
  2. After ZTERM 2000 is installed and running, use REGEDIT's Import Registry File option to import the keys saved on the floppy.

What happens to the registration code when upgrading from Windows 3.1?

If you have a machine that is running ZTERM 2000 on Windows 3.1, when upgrading to Windows 95 or Windows NT, ensure that the WIN.INI file is kept during the upgrade process. You might have to copy it from the old \Windows directory to the new Windows directory (\Winnt for example) in the case where you decided to install a fresh copy of Windows, rather than overwriting the existing installation.

When ZTERM 2000 first runs, it looks for the old registration keys in WIN.INI and if found, moves them to the Windows Registry. If it couldn't find the keys in WIN.INI, new keys are created which expire in 14 days.

Should you upgrade and erase WIN.INI before ZTERM 2000 is first run on the new operating system, you will need to edit WIN.INI and move the keys from WIN.INI to the Windows Registry using the REGEDIT program by hand.

Windows Compatibility

Why are there two sets of installation programs?

Although technically the versions of ZTERM 2000 for Win32s and all other 32-bit Microsoft operating systems are the same, the version compatible with Win32s is generated using an older Microsoft C compiler. The latest compiler used for the true 32-bit operating systems (like Windows 95 and NT) generates smaller and faster code, however, this code doesn't run on Win32s.

As a result, you should use the correct installation program for your operating system.

Why does Windows NT think there is a mouse on a serial connection to a host computer?

When Windows NT starts, it polls the serial ports for a mouse. For some reason, if a host computer (more specifically, an Alpha Micro AMOS host) is connected to one of the serial ports, Windows NT will think there's a mouse connected and render the port unusable.

To get around this problem, edit the c:\boot.ini file and add /noserialmice switch to the operating system definitions. For example:

multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINNT="Windows NT Workstation Version 4.00"
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINNT="Windows NT Workstation Version 4.00 [VGA mode]" /basevideo /sos

would become:

multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINNT="Windows NT Workstation Version 4.00" /noserialmice
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINNT="Windows NT Workstation Version 4.00 [VGA mode]" /basevideo /sos /noserialmice

Windows 3.1 Issues

Note: This information only applies to ZTERM for Windows 1.2 and not ZTERM 2000 - ZTERM 2000 only runs on true 32-bit Windows operating systems.

Why is Win32s needed on Windows 3.1?

ZTERM for Windows 1.2 is a 32-bit application (called a Win32 application in Microsoft parlez) designed to run on Windows 95 and Windows NT. Windows 3.1 and Windows for Workgroups 3.11 are both 16-bit operating systems and therefore incompatible directly with ZTERM 2000. Win32s (the 's' stands for subset) is an extension for these 16-bit operating systems that provides some compatibility for Win32 applications, like ZTERM. This doesn't mean that all 32-bit applications will work on Windows 3.1 - we have to go to great lengths to ensure that ZTERM runs on Win32s as many of the advanced features of Windows 95 and Windows NT simply aren't present.

What is different when I run ZTERM on Windows 3.1?

Wherever possible, we tried to keep ZTERM the same on both 16-bit and 32-bit operating systems. However, due to the "primitive" nature of Windows 3.1, certain features disable themselves when running on Win32s. Specifically, these are:

Why are serial transfers slow or unreliable on Windows 3.1?

First, lets mention another serial related issue with Windows 3.1. You need to be using a 16550 UART. The extra overhead incurred by the Win32s layer prevents correct operation with the older 8250 UART.

The serial driver for the 16550 UART that comes with Windows (COMM.DRV) is very inefficient and doesn't correctly setup the FIFO. We strongly recommend replacing the default driver with an enhanced driver. We've successfully tested Cybersoft's CyberCom driver with ZTERM 2000. It's available on the Internet at http://www.cybersoft.com.au/cybercom.shtml

Why do I get a "Can't load WINSOCK.DLL" message each time ZTERM starts?

ZTERM tries to load this file in order to allow TCP/IP communication. There is code in ZTERM that prevents this error message from being displayed, but a bug in Win32s stops it from working. Microsoft is no longer doing development on Win32s, so this will not be resolved.

To hide this error message, edit ZTERM.INI in the directory where you installed ZTERM (C:\ZTERM normally on Windows 3.1). Add "NoWinsock=1" to this file and ZTERM will stop trying to load WINSOCK.DLL. Obviously if you add TCP/IP to the system at a later date, you'll need to remove this line from the ZTERM.INI file.

On Windows 95 systems that don't have a WSOCK32.DLL (the 32-bit version of WINSOCK.DLL), ZTERM 2000 will add this to the .INI file for you automatically.

Why do none of the ZTERM versions since 1.2.105b not work on Win32s?

Since Windows 3.1 is a 10 year old operating system, we've dropped all development work on it. As a result, no versions past 1.2.105b nor ZTERM 2000 will run on this operating system.

Using ZTERM 2000

How can I stop an Automatic Connection before it starts?

If you have automatic connection enabled, when you launch ZTERM 2000 you can prevent the connection from starting by clicking on a menu item or toolbar icon while the splash screen is shown.

Why do I sometimes get an error reporting that the ZTERM 2000 font couldn't be loaded?

This appears to happen when a very large number of fonts (more than 150) have been installed on Windows 95 systems. For some strange reason when this many fonts are present, Windows won't automatically install the ZTERM 2000 fonts.

The solution to this problem is to use the Windows Explorer and navigate to the \Windows\Fonts directory, locate the ZTERM 2000 font (the one called ZTERM - the ZTERM Printer font doesn't have this problem). Double-click on it to open it - once this has been done, ZTERM should work correctly.

Thanks to Ritchie Jeune from Jersey in the Channel Islands for pointing this solution out.

Why does ZTERM's FTP client mess up, yet Microsoft's command line FTP program works fine?

Since ZTERM 2000 uses part of Microsoft's Internet Explorer program in order to do FTP, if MSIE is configured to use a Proxy Server for it's FTP access, ZTERM probably won't be able to do FTP since the Proxy Server will route the requests over to the Internet connection rather than keeping it on the local network.

Resolving this problem is very simple, but varies depending on the version of Internet Explorer being used due to differences in the way the various versions of Internet Explorer work. In all cases, find the "Internet Explorer" icon on the desktop, right click on it, select Properties and then select the Connection tab.

 MSIE 3.x Proxy Settings On IE 3.x, you must fill in the addresses of the hosts to bypass from the Proxy Server - in this case 10.1.4.1 is the host address. The "Do not use proxy..." option does not appear to work correctly with IE 3.x.
 MSIE 4.x Proxy Settings On IE 4.x and Windows 98, just use the "Bypass proxy server for local (Intranet) addresses".
 MSIE 5.x Proxy Settings On IE 5.x use the Local Area Network Setting dialog. This is accessed via the Internet Options dialog, on the Connection page. "Bypass proxy server for local addresses" should be checked.

Each time I launch ZTERM, I go straight into a profile. How do I setup a shortcut to the Profile Manager?

Simple - if there's no arguments on the command-line, the ZTERM Profile Manager is displayed. If there's text on the command-line, it's assumed that it's the name of a profile and therefore that profile is launched. If the command-line points to an unknown profile (ztermexe tabs.alphamicro.com for example), ZTERM will assume the connection is via telnet using the 24-line VT100 emulator.

I used both ZTERM 1.2 and the betas of ZTERM 2000. How can I move all my profiles to ZTERM 2000?

Follow these steps:

If the migration tool doesn't appear during ZTERM 2000 setup, you didn't delete the tree in the registry correctly. Cancel the setup and try again.

Why does ZTERM's FTP client display error code 12163?

ZTERM uses a part of Microsoft's Internet Explorer to connect and transfer data using the FTP protocol. If you checked the "Work Offline" option on Internet Explorer's File menu, this error will occur if you attempt to perform transfers via your local-area-network when you're not connected to the Internet. The solution is to uncheck this option in Internet Explorer.

Thanks to Peter Remick at Applied Micro Systems for pointing this out.

Font Related Issues

What are the differences between Bitmap and True-Type fonts in ZTERM?

ZTERM's terminal emulation window can use either a special bitmap font designed for use with ZTERM or any monospaced True-Type font. The preferable mode is to use the bitmap font, especially when dealing with applications that switch in and out of 132 column mode. The bitmap fonts are specifically designed to scale between 80 and 132 column modes while maintaining the same character height. If you use a True-Type font, switching between these modes will result in the character height changing, which can lead to difficulties in reading the display.

Why can't I resize the ZTERM window when using a bitmap font?

Since the bitmap font is supplied only in a certain number of resolutions, if this were to be allowed, scroll bars would have to be used to scroll the entire display in and out of view. When you select a font with the font sizing buttons, ZTERM resizes itself automatically so that the display can be viewed and that no window height or width changes with occur when switching in and out of 132 column modes.

We at COOL.STF are generally opposed to the idea of scroll bars in terminal emulators. Having used emulators that operate this way, we decided not to take this approach since it makes using the host system more difficult when you can't see everything the host is trying to tell you.

Why does the toolbar get messed up at 800x600 resolution?

If you haven't seen this, click on the screenshot below:

ZTERM screen problems at 800x600

This problem occurs because the largest ZTERM bitmap font was designed for 800x600 displays in full screen mode. As a result of the Windows menus, caption area, toolbar and status bar, there simply isn't enough room to display the 26 line emulation correctly and the result is rather messy.

There are a few simple solutions to this problem:

When running without the toolbar and statusbar or running in full screen mode, ZTERM will almost completely fill the screen as shown by the following screenshots:

No problem without toolbar and statusbarNo problem in full screen mode

Why do some True-Type fonts not have line-drawing characters?

True-Type font files can contain many different characters for many different languages as well as containing special symbols like line-drawing characters. If you don't see the line-drawing characters, it's most probably because the font doesn't have them.

Printing Questions

Should I use the dot-matrix emulator to print pre-printed forms?

ZTERM's dot-matrix emulator was designed to allow either 80x66 or 132x66 output on either letter or A4 paper using Microsoft Windows printer drivers. This is acheived by taking into the consideration the printable area of the printer (and this varies from printer to printer) and then generating a font that will allow exactly 80x66 (10 CPI) or 132x66 (17 CPI). The term "Characters Per Inch" in this context is actually redundant since the true characters per inch resulting from the dot-matrix emulator will vary depending on the type of printer being used. ZTERM uses the CPI term since it's obvious to most people that have experience with dot-matrix printers - they typically have a button on the front panel that allows selection between the two font sizes.

If you have forms designed with output from the dot-matrix emulator in mind, please take into consideration that the character placement will most likely be dependant on the particular printer you're using and the results may not be reproducable with a different printer.

I select various options when ZTERM asks for a printer, but none of these settings work. Why?

ZTERM can send output to printers in two different ways - direct to the parallel/serial port and via the Windows print engine. When you use the dot-matrix emulator or perform a print-screen with the "Windows Characters" option checked, the Windows print engine is used and Windows will perform the required setup on the printer to honour your printer selections - for example, selecting paper from a certain source.

When ZTERM sends data directly to the port, literrally the characters from the host or the print-screen are sent directly to the port with nothing added. This is done to keep compatibility with as many printers as possible and causes the loss of any printer setup commands.

ZTERM 2000 and Linux/Wine

Unless you've been living on a remote desert island recently, you've probably heard of the Linux operating system. It's a free operating system that's very similar to Unix and includes a graphical interface much like Windows. Applications written for Windows do not run on Linux and vice-versa, however, due to the huge number of applications written for Windows, there is work under way to make these applications run on Linux. This effort is called Wine.

Wine actually stands for "Wine is not an emulator" - i.e. it doesn't emulate a PC's processor so that Windows can run. Instead, it relies on the fact that the procesor running Linux is also x86 compatible. Wine loads the Windows application in memory and runs it just like any normal Linux program - however, when the Windows application being run tries to call into Windows (for example to paint the screen or get keyboard input), Wine gets in the way and translates the call into Windows to a call that Linux can handle.

Wine is still being developed - however, for basic terminal emulation capability, ZTERM 2000 does actually work on Linux with Wine. If you need full ZTERM capability, you'd be better off by using VMWare and installing a copy of Windows. This section of the FAQ is for those of you brave enough to get ZTERM running in Wine. All of the steps mentioned here assume you are running Corel Linux. This is available at many retail outlets and can also be downloaded for free from Corel's website - http://linux.corel.com/. Corel Linux is based on Debian Linux.

Click for full size

I bought a copy of Linux and installed it. How do I get Wine running?

You should really be reading the documentation on Wine before you even start this process, but this is a summary of what you need to do:

sudo mkdir -p /usr/local/lib/win/windows
cd /usr/local/lib/win/windows
sudo mkdir system temp
sudo touch win.ini
cd system
sudo touch shell.dll shell32.dll winsock.dll wnsock32.dll

And how about getting ZTERM 2000 running?

cd /usr/local/lib/win/windows
mv Cdrvdl32.dll CDRVDL32.dll
mv Cdrvhf32.dll CDRVHF32.dll
mv Cdrvxf32.dll CDRVXF32.dll
cd /usr/local/lib/win/windows
wine "ztermexe.exe profile"

I got ZTERM running on Linux, but some features don't work. When will they be fixed?

This is a Wine issue and not a ZTERM issue. Wine is still under development, so if it doesn't work correctly today, try waiting a month or two and then downloading a newer version of Wine. This is one of the disadvantages of free software.